Make a Worry Box

Part of the problem with worry is that it rolls around and around in your head.  It’s the hamster on the wheel.  Or the monkey mind that keeps you awake in the middle of the night.

Try getting those worries out of your head and into a Worry Box.  Take any box and decorate it as you like and put a label on it:  Worry Box. 

When you identify a worry, write it on a piece of paper and put it in the worry box.  When your monkey mind wants to worry about it, go get the piece of paper out of the box.  Make a rule for yourself: You can only worry about it while you are sitting there with the paper in hand, sitting next to your Worry Box.

This technique works well in combination with setting aside “worry time.” [Read more about that HERE.] 

Floatation Therapy for Anxiety and Stress

If you’re as old as me, you may remember old TV commercials with the slogan “Calgon, take me away” as someone is floating along in a bubble bath. I loved that slogan. I could imagine all my stress floating away.

floatingawayIn 2016, floating now has a whole new meaning. Floatation therapy is an emerging relaxation treatment, with research supporting its effectiveness for stress, anxiety, sleeplessness, depression, muscle tension and more.

Float centers are popping up like hotcakes all over the US. We now have three in the metro Milwaukee area. I love floating and I float at A Better Me Spa in Menomonee Falls (more about my float experience below).

Your Senses Deserve a Break Today (R.E.S.T.)

Another old commercial slogan used to say “You deserve a break today.” What we all really need these days is to give our senses a break.

Our busy, 7*24, technology-filled world gives us constant stimulation of our senses of sight, sound, and touch. Constant sensory stimulation negatively affects the nervous system and contributes to anxiety.

Floating gives your nervous system 60 minutes of R.E.S.T. (Restricted Environmental Stimulation Technique), sometimes referred to as sensory deprivation. In the most positive way, floating creates a very peaceful, sensory-limited experience.

The Float Room

Your senses of sound, sight, and touch are calmed by a warm, quiet, dark floating environment. Some float centers have float tanks or pods, while others have float rooms (which I love).

float_poolA float room (I think of it as a float pool) is approximately 8 feet long * 5 feet wide. It holds about 10 inches of water with about 1000 lbs. of dissolved Epsom Salt, which enables you to float automatically. Epsom salt is made of magnesium which has many health benefits as well. 

Water is heated to an average skin temperature (93.5F) which reduces the sensation between body and water. All light and sound can be eliminated to allow your brain and body to relax completely. Often there is ambient light and/or relaxing music available if you prefer.

Backed by Scientific Research

In the 1970s, Peter Suedfeld and Roderick Borrie began to explore the therapeutic benefits of floating. A study in the late 1990s found that more than 90 percent of people experienced feelings of relaxation. A 2014 study found that twelve 45-minute float sessions over seven weeks reduced anxiety, stress, and depression.

brainwaves-theta-stateResearch suggests the effects of a one hour float session are equivalent to eight hours of sleep! Floating quiets your brainwaves from the active beta and alpha waves, to theta brainwaves which are more calming, meditative, and restorative. 

Brain imaging shows calming effects in the brain (the amygdala calms down – that’s the fight or flight part of the brain). Blood testing shows reduced levels of cortisol (one of the primary and problematic stress hormones).

In addition to all of the above findings which show how floating can be great to help reduce stress and anxiety, floating is also good for pain, muscles, blood pressure, circulation and more!

Check out this Time Magazine article about floating and find a lot more floating research HERE .

My Floating Experience

floatingabettermeI float at A Better Me Spa in Menomonee Falls, the only float center in the area which has float rooms.  There’s a very comfortable, private suite that includes a changing area, shower and the float pool itself.  

 

floatsuite

From the shower, you open a door and step right into the float pool. Lay down and you will automatically float because of all the Epsom salt. Adjust (or turn off) the lights and music, and float for 60 minutes.

During my first float, I found it “strangely relaxing.” Strange because it is such a unique experience, and also because I wouldn’t have expected it to be as relaxing as it actually is.

My husband said it was the most relaxing thing he ever did!

Finally, a break from all the stimuli, multi-tasking, to-do lists, and interruptions of a typical day! Permission to relax…

At first I found myself full of thoughts about the float itself: how do I move around and what is most comfortable, do I like the music or not, do I like the neck pillow or not, what am I supposed to do now, how many minutes have passed, etc…

After a short time, my brain slowed down and I reminded myself to relax. I focused on my breathing, let go of body tension, and became meditative. At the end of 60 minutes, a dim light goes on to signal completion. Then you step right into the shower. Ahhh… I felt amazingly relaxed.

Floating is like pressing a “Reset” button for both mind and body. Another calming, self-care tool to add to your wellness toolbox!

Chamomilla for Calming Anxiety and Peaceful Sleep

greatideaThis is a homeopathic (all natural, plant-based supplement) derived from the plant German Chamomile. It promotes comfort and relaxation, while helping with anxiety and general irritability.

Dissolve 5 pellets under your tongue, or add a few pellets to a cup of herbal tea at night to promote a peaceful night’s sleep.

Chamomilla is a great addition to your natural medicine cabinet!

50 Signs of Stress and Anxiety that May Surprise You

warningsign_istock_000004940205xsmallAll to often, we are unaware of how our stress is affecting us. Here are 50 signs to help you get a better understanding of how YOUR stress affects not only your health but also your life.

1. Frequent headaches, jaw clenching or pain
2. Gritting, grinding teeth
3. Stuttering or stammering
4. Tremors, trembling of lips, hands
5. Neck ache, back pain, muscle spasms
6. Light headedness, faintness, dizziness
7. Ringing, buzzing or “popping sounds
8. Frequent blushing, sweating
9. Cold or sweaty hands, feet
10. Dry mouth, problems swallowing
11. Frequent colds, infections, herpes sores
12. Rashes, itching, hives, “goose bumps”
13. Unexplained or frequent “allergy” attacks
14. Heartburn, stomach pain, nausea
15. Excess belching, flatulence
16. Constipation, diarrhea
17. Difficulty breathing, sighing
18. Sudden attacks of panic
19. Chest pain, palpitations
20. Frequent urination
21. Poor sexual desire or performance
22. Excess anxiety, worry, guilt, nervousness
23. Increased anger, frustration, hostility
24. Depression, frequent or wild mood swings
25. Increased or decreased appetite
26. Insomnia, nightmares, disturbing dreams
27. Difficulty concentrating, racing thoughts
28. Trouble learning new information
29. Forgetfulness, disorganization, confusion
30. Difficulty in making decisions
31. Feeling overloaded or overwhelmed
32. Frequent crying spells or suicidal thoughts
33. Feelings of loneliness or worthlessness
34. Little interest in appearance, punctuality
35. Nervous habits, fidgeting, feet tapping
36. Increased frustration, irritability, edginess
37. Overreaction to petty annoyances
38. Increased number of minor accidents
39. Obsessive or compulsive behavior
40. Reduced work efficiency or productivity
41. Lies or excuses to cover up poor work
42. Rapid or mumbled speech
43. Excessive defensiveness or suspiciousness
44. Problems in communication, sharing
45. Social withdrawal and isolation
46. Constant tiredness, weakness, fatigue
47. Frequent use of over-the-counter drugs
48. Weight gain or loss without diet
49. Increased smoking, alcohol or drug use
50. Excessive gambling or impulse buying
(Source: stresstop.com)

Learn more about stress here!

Busy and Productive are Not the Same Thing

Di Philippi, Wellness Counseling Milwaukee; Busy creates overwhelm and anxietyAre you so busy that it causes you stress or anxiety? 

You try so hard to get it all done. 
You’re going non-stop. 
You multi-task, trying to maximize every minute. 

Always More To Do

There’s just more and more to do these days.  Most of my clients complain that they are so busy “DOING” that there is no time to rest or play.  There is no such thing as “Me Time.” 

Too much “DOING” and BUSY-NESS eventually wears you down with fatigue, low energy, sleep problems, illness, anxiety, irritability, and dissatisfaction. 

If you wake up the next day and go right back to push, push, push…the quality and productivity of your work goes down.  In the end, you actually get less done.

High Intensity Interval Training

Di Philippi, Wellness Counseling Milwaukee; Work Hard-Rest Hard to reduce anxietyWork smarter not harder with High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT).  This is a concept used in fitness and athletics.  Interval training means alternating intense periods of exercise coupled with adequate recovery/rest time. 

  1. Work hard – really give it your 100% effort and focus for a short interval
  2. Rest!
  3. Repeat Steps 1 & 2

In the fitness world, this ultimately maximizes productivity of time spent working out because it makes most efficient/productive use of your energy and muscles.  Athletes don’t lift weights while trying to simultaneously trying to do two other things.

Busy and Productive are Not the Same Thing

You can apply this High Intensity Interval Training to your life and to your To Do Lists.  You cannot do everything at your 100% all the time without some recovery time.  It’s not humanly possible.

Busy and productivity are not the same thing.  Busy all the time leads to feeling anxiety and overwhelm, which makes it harder to get things done.  Productivity means alternating “DOING” with recovery time, which reduces overwhelm and anxiety and ultimately makes it easier to get things done.  You’ll feel better about yourself too.

To use HIIT in day-to-day life:

  • Don’t multi-task – either work hard or rest hard
  • Take a 5 min recovery period for every hour of work
  • Don’t multi-task during your recovery period
  • Value your recovery time as much as your “DOING” time

No Multi-tasking during Recovery Time

Holistic Anxiety Treatment with Di Philippi, Milwaukee, BrookfieldThe old thoughts that told you to keep pushing more and more will tempt you to do something while you’re resting in order to “make productive use of that time.”   You will have to remind yourself that the reverse is actually true!

Even neuroscience research is now showing that multi-tasking is really a misnomer.  In the brain it is considered “switch-tasking”, with the brain constantly switching back and forth so fast it appears to us to be simultaneous.  Switch-tasking actually uses more brain energy than doing one thing at a time.

Recovery time is downtime — no “doing” but instead resting.  Many people have told me they are so used to running around like a chicken with their head cut off that they forgot how to rest and relax.   So here are a few reminders: 

  • Sit (and do nothing else!)
  • Do Mindful Belly Breathing
  • Take a nap
  • Do a quick meditation
  • Sit or play with your pet
  • Mindful eating (Note to Self: eating while on your computer or phone is not recovery)
  • Have a cup of tea
  • Go for short walk
  • Listen to relaxing music
  • Listen to Happy music
  • Stretch
  • Read a book for fun
  • Call a friend

Apply HIIT Interval Style to Your Overall Week

Schedule in recovery time into your overall week or it won’t happen.  There may be a day that requires you to push at your 100% all day with long hours.  This is life.  But please don’t fool yourself into thinking you can do that every day and still be at your 100%

Sprinters give it their all.  But they couldn’t do this if they continued jogging for the rest of the day.  Running yourself ragged is not the answer!

Anxiety from Facebook?

Everybody loves Facebook, right?

Then I wonder why a Google search for “want to quit using Facebook” gets 281 million search results. Compare that to “want to quit smoking” which gets a mere 30 million hits.

Facebook and social media have changed the way people interact and have relationships with one another – no doubt about it.

We all know the benefits of Facebook for keeping in touch, feeling connected to others, sharing information.

facebooklike  However, my clients also tell me about lots of stress with Facebook:

→ Feeling not good enough, compared to the Facebook Faces that others put on

→ Feeling everyone else has more fun, has no problems, has more friends, etc.

→ Relationship conflicts/misunderstandings over Facebook posts

→ Trust issues arising about a partner’s use of Facebook or selection of Friends

→ Feeling even more time pressured, because Facebook chews up a lot of time

→ Feeling uncomfortable or anxious if they’re NOT able to check Facebook throughout the day (a symptom of addiction)

→ Staying up late on Facebook instead of getting needed sleep (another symptom)

What Does the Research say?

Mixed results:  Some studies show Facebook helps people feel connected to other people and can increase a sense of well-being.

Studies also show Facebook can affect your mood – in either direction!  Researchers found that for every negative post, there was an extra 1.29 negative posts than normal in that person’s social network. Every upbeat post caused an extra 1.75 positive posts in the social network.

Holistic Anxiety therapy with Di Philippi, MA, LPC

I was surprised to find plenty of research showing thatFacebook can increase stress, increase anxiety and negatively affect a person’s sense of self…

1.  Over half of the respondents of one study felt uneasy when they were unable to access their social media, feeling a constant impulse to check for updates, increasing stress and anxiety.

2.  Additionally, two-thirds had difficulty sleeping due to anxiety and other negative emotions after they had used social media sites.

3.  The constant updating of Facebook led many respondents to frequently compare themselves to others, leading to feelings of inadequacy and increasing anxiety.

4.  Another study showed Facebook can increase social anxiety when a person is faced with actual in-person meetings.

5.  Researchers studied 82 young, frequent Facebook users and found that when the participants increased their Facebook use, their state of well-being declined. Those who increased the amount of time they spent with people face-to-face had an increased sense of well-being.

This is just a sampling of studies on negative effects of social media sites on users. On the flip side, other studies have shown Facebook to have positive effects. See this New Yorker article for more.

What is Right for You?

You are not alone if you have found Facebook to cause stress, anxiety, or take up too much time.

Are you feeling pressure from Facebook, or feeling over-connected to constant checking? You may want to check out the 99 Days of Freedom from Facebook online study on how life without Facebook impacts user happiness.  This is a study you can participate in.

I think that (as with most things in life!) finding the right balance is key. Being aware of the positive and negative effects of social media helps you make very conscious choices about what’s right for you.

Is It You or Your Hormones?

wcmheader-2_Holistic Solutions for AnxietyLadies, have you ever noticed:

  • Anxiety that comes and goes along with your monthly cycle?
  • Anxiety that’s manageable throughout the month but gets unmanageable before your period?
  • Sudden increase in anxiety at mid-life?
  • Anxiety before or during pregnancy?

These anxieties are all very common…and they are no coincidence!  (And no, it’s NOT all in your head!)

Hormones Work Together as a System

When women complain of symptoms that coincide with our cycles, doctors are quick to declare a problem with the sex hormonal balance (estrogen and progesterone).  But our hormonal systems are more complicated than we are led to believe.

Imbalance in our stress hormones (cortisol, adrenaline and others) disrupts and causes imbalance in our sex hormones.

All of our hormones work as a SYSTEM.  Our hormonal system is intricately interrelated and interdependent, much like a symphony, so an imbalance of one causes a cascade effect on the others.

The Big Problem: Imbalanced Stress Hormones

The stress hormone cortisol is a very big culprit in hormonal imbalance.  More and more research is helping us understand how cortisol imbalance can lead to serious health problems such as:

      • Anxiety
      • Insomnia
      • Sex hormone issues related to mid-life, pregnancy, and PMS
      • Thyroid dysregulation
      • Blood sugar dysregulation
      • Suppression of the immune system

 The Big Solution: Rebalance Stress Hormones

When stress and anxiety get your stress hormones out of balance, your sex hormones get imbalanced too.

The good news is that the reverse is also true: reducing stress and anxiety allows ALL of your hormonal system to rebalance, including stress hormones AND sex hormones. So it’s time to take stress and anxiety reduction seriously.

Do any of these common sources of stress and anxiety apply to you?

  • Insufficient or poor quality sleepanxietywordsaroundhead-dreamstime_xs_23159798
  • Illness or pain, especially long-lasting or chronic
  • Feelings of anxiety, depression or despair
  • Deadlines
  • Arguments
  • Emotional loss: breakups, loss of family, friends, pets
  • Financial loss
  • Feelings of guilt, shame, unworthiness, or self-hatred
  • Moving
  • Changing jobs or careers
  • Responsibility without control
  • Feeling out of control/loss of personal power
  • Not enough downtime or “me” time
  • Childhood abuse of any kind
  • Historical stress from family relationships and childhood experiences

* List adapted from Marcelle Pick, “Is it Me or My Hormones?”

Reducing these sources of stress and anxiety will go a long way toward rebalancing your stress hormones AND your sex hormones.  See if you can identify the root cause(s) that may be contributing to your hormonal issues so you can return back to balance.  And please give me a call if you’d like to see how I might be able to help.  I’d be happy to offer you a free phone consultation to talk about it.

Food as Medicine for Stress & Anxiety

Nature is truly amazing and has provided us with some foods that naturally seem to help reduce cortisol (the stress hormone that can wreak havoc with your health), and also reduce symptoms of stress and anxiety.

Recent studies suggest …

shellfish_stencil

 

Shellfish: People who ate 3-4 ounces daily lowered their risk of anxiety, stress, and depression by 30%. 

 

MGlass of milk on a black backgroundilk: 4+ servings of calcium daily may help lower the risk of anxiety and irritability, and promote the relaxation necessary for proper sleep patterns.

Anxiety is Hazardous to Your Health

If you have anxiety, it’s very likely that you also experience one or more physical health issues. 
 
Did you know that quite a growing number of illnesses and chronic disease conditions are correlated with anxiety disorders?
 
Despite scientific research connecting the dots between anxiety and a growing list of anxiety-related illnesses,anxiety often goes unidentified and is frequently overlooked as a source of other physiological health issues.
 
Physical Illnesses Linked to Anxiety
 
Anxiety has now been implicated in many chronic physical conditions including:
  • gastrointestinal conditions including IBS and Acid Reflux
  • insomnia
  • heart disease
  • high blood pressure (hypertension)
  • thyroid problems
  • arthritis
  • migraine headaches
  • chronic respiratory disorders including COPD
Research also shows the impact of anxiety on specific groups of people:
  • People who have panic attacks are more likely to have mitral valve prolapse, hypertension, peptic ulcer, diabetes, chest pain (angina) or thyroid disease.
  • Men with anxiety disorders are at greater risk for cardiac disorders, hypertension, gastrointestinal disorders, respiratory illness, asthma, and back pain. 
  • Women with anxiety disorders are more likely to have a history of cardiac problems, hypertension, metabolic, gastrointestinal, dermatological, respiratory disorders and arthritis.  
These conditions have also been recently correlated with anxiety:
  • fibromyalgia
  • female hormonal imbalance (including PCOS)
  • sexual dysfunction
  • insulin resistance
  • blood sugar issues
  • weight gain
  • Type 2 diabetes
Serious Stuff
 
Six of the leading causes of death have been also linked with anxiety and stress: heart disease, cancer, lung ailments, accidents, cirrhosis of the liver and even suicide.
 
When people with any anxiety-related disease also have untreated anxiety, the disease itself can be more difficult to treat.  Physical symptoms often become worse.
 
The problem is becoming so big that the World Health Organization reports that anxiety and depression (which are often interlinked) could be the second leading causes of disability worldwide by 2020.  That’s just 5 years away!
 
The Missing Connection
 
Anxiety often goes unidentified and is frequently overlooked as a source of other physical health issues.
 
Part of the problem is that although anxiety itself starts in the mind, it does create very real physical symptoms.  Those symptoms can look very much like symptoms of other chronic conditions, such as digestive, thyroid and respiratory disorders.  So it can be confusing for you and your health care practitioners too.
 
Typical anxiety symptoms that can also look like other physical illnesses include:
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Lightheadedness or dizziness
  • Heart palpitations
  • Breathing difficulty
  • Chest pain
  • Numbing & tingling (especially arms and legs)
  • Sweating
  • Chills or flush (hot flash)
  • Trembling
  • Choking
  • Insomnia
  • Headache
It’s NOT All in Your Head!
 
img_4128Many people with anxiety disorders go through life living needlessly with physical health problems that could be eliminated or improved through anxiety treatment.  Unfortunately, they never make the connection that anxiety could be the source of the problem (or be exacerbating the problem).  
 
If you think you might fall into this category — or if you have IBS, asthma, COPD, or heart disease — you may want to come in to see me to be evaluated for anxiety.  The same is true if you have pain, dizziness, insomnia, or other symptoms that persist after physical causes have been ruled out.
 
Please know that all symptoms are real — and treatable! — whether they originate in the body or the mind.  
 
Holistic, Long-Term Solutions for Anxiety
 

I use the 2 most effective long-term solutions for anxiety (and therefore, for any physical problems linked with anxiety):

These are holistic, healthy, non-medication solutions so you can learn new skills and tools to manage and prevent anxiety.  I help people identify and shift thoughts that generate anxiety, as well as learn new skills to react differently to anxiety-provoking situations.
 
Anxiety medications alone are less effective than CBT and Anxiety Counseling/Psychotherapy over the long term; they may also have unpleasant side effects and interact with other medications. Most of my clients work toward eliminating the medication altogether… 
 
Skills not pills can help you reduce anxiety and improve anxiety-related illnesses at the same time.
 

Sources:

  • Harvard Medical School Special Health Reports
  • National Institutes of Health / World Health Organization 
  • The American Institute for Cognitive Therapy
  • WebMD
  • American Medical Association (AMA), Archives of Internal Medicine

Another Natural Treatment for Anxiety Symptoms

While working on the root cause of anxiety is the best long-term solution, we all need some good tools to gain some control over the symptoms.

Here’s a unique holistic tool for managing anxiety symptoms:  Homeopathy.

 

I’m not an expert on homeopathic remedies, but I work closely with someone who is an expert: my colleague Cherri Schleicher, Family Nurse Practitioner.  As we share office space together, we often collaborate in the treatment of our patients.  Cherri has taught me a lot about natural solutions for anxiety symptoms and now I’d like to share some of what I have learned with you.

What is Homepathy?

homeopathy

 

Homeopathy, or homeopathic medicine, is a medical philosophy and practice based on the idea that the body has the ability to heal itself. Homeopathy was founded in the late 1700s in Germany and has been widely practiced throughout Europe. Homeopathic remedies have been regulated in the United States since 1938 and are considered to be safe, with no side effects.

The good news is that homeopathic remedies are quite inexpensive.  They are small pellets dissolved under the tongue, having a very slight sweet taste. They are formulated from plants and mineral, and are completely natural with no chemical additives.

 

Homepathic Medicine for Anxiety

The big benefit of homeopathics for anxiety is that they have no risk of dependence or risk of being habit forming (as many prescription medications do). They have no side effects and can be used to treat children, as well as used in pregnancy. They can also be given to someone who is currently on a medication for anxiety to help in potentially decreasing the dose or permanently weaning off of the medication.

The right homeopathic medication takes into account your specific feelings, anxiety symptoms, and anxiety provoking events.

Therefore, in order for homeopathic remedies to work well on YOUR anxiety, it’s important to get an individualized recommendation from a homeopathy practitioner.  Here are some of the more common homeopathic medicines that my colleague Cherri Schleicher uses to treat anxiety symptoms:

 

Aconite is a homeopathic that is very beneficial for panic attacks and the individual who has a fear of dying. This fear tends to be enhanced at night.

Arsenicum Album is for the anxious individual who tends to wake up between 1-3:00am. They may also experience “feelings of doom.”

Argentum Nitricum is more for the individual who is agitated, experiences anticipatory anxiety, phobias, abdominal pain some dizziness. They also may do frequent “throat clearing.”

Ignatia is helpful after the person experiences emotional shock, also intense grief. They may also experience palpitations.

Gelsenium is helpful for the person who experiences paralyzing fear. They may feel as if their body is trembling and numbness like “their legs are being cut-off.”  Their anxiety can cause headaches around the eyes.

Kali Bromatum is helpful for the individual who becomes physically agitated with their anxiety, fidgeting of the hands and also experiences restless sleep.

Phosphorus is a medicine that helps the person who becomes more anxious in the evening and they have a tendency to feel vulnerable.

Staphysagria is for the person who feels easily humiliated and has a sense of “injustice.”

One Size Does Not Fit All

You are a unique being, and the way your anxiety appears can be unique. Symptoms can change from person to person, and can even change at different times. 

Treatment with homeopathic medicine must be adjusted and an individualized plan of care will be based on your personal history and your specific anxiety reactions. Although homeopathy is safe when used in conjunction with anxiety symptoms, it is important to determine the root cause of the problem and take an integrative approach to returning to wellness.

Feel free to contact Cherri Schleicher, FNPc APNP AHN-BC, to explore how homeopathy might be useful for you!      

You can call her at 414-640-6287 or email her at cholisticfam@wi.rr.com

One last note…if your anxiety is keeping you up at night, there is a homeopathic solution for that too!